Author: Bialogue: Bisexual + Queer Politics


2017 National School Climate Survey (Encuesta sobre el Ambiente Escolar)


LGBTQ youth, speak out about your school experiences! (Jóvenes LGBTQ – ¡Hable de sus experiencias en la escuela!)

bisexual-community:

[USA]: 2017 National School Climate Survey (Encuesta sobre el Ambiente Escolar)  LGBTQ+ youth, speak out about your school experiences! (Jóvenes LGBTQ+ – ¡Hable de sus experiencias en la escuela!)

The 2017 National School Climate Survey is GLSEN’s tenth national survey of lesbian, gay, bisexual+, transgender, and queer youth. It is a crucial tool in GLSEN’s mission for fighting anti-LGBTQ+ bias in K-12 schools across the nation. The information gathered from this survey will help GLSEN to inform education policymakers and the public about the right of all students to be treated with respect in their schools. 

La Nacional sobre el Ambiente Escolar 2017 es la décima encuesta de jóvenes lesbianas, homosexuales, bisexuales, transgéneros, y queer. Es fundamental a la misión de GLSEN a luchar contra los prejuicios anti-LGBTQ+ que existe en las escuelas K-12 en todo el país. La información recopilada a partir de esta encuesta ayudará a GLSEN a informar legisladores de educación y el público sobre el derecho que tienen todos los estudiantes ser tratados con respeto en las escuelas.

If you attended high school or middle school sometime during the last school year (2016-2017), identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual+, transgender, queer or questioning, and are at least 13 years old, tell us about your experiences in school. (If you did not complete the entire school year you can still participate in the survey.) The survey is completely anonymous.

Si asistió un colegio o una escuela mediana alguna vez durante el último año escolar (2016-2017), identifica como lesbiana, homosexual, bisexual+, transgénero, queer o está cuestionando su sexualidad, y tiene al menos de 13 años, cuéntanos sus experiencias en la escuela. (Si no completó todo el año escolar todavía puede participar en la encuesta.) La encuesta está completamente anónima.

The survey asks questions about your experiences in school, including hearing homophobic remarks, being harassed because of your sexual orientation and/or how you express your gender and how supportive your school is of LGBTQ+ students.

La encuesta contiene preguntas sobre sus experiencias escolares, incluyendo si ha oído comentarios homofóbicos, si ha acosado a causa de su orientación sexual y/o como expresa su género y como su escuela apoya los estudiantes LGBTQ+.

To take the survey, click here.
Para hacer la encuesta en español, haz click aquí.

bisexual-community:

[USA]: 2017 National School Climate Survey (Encuesta sobre el Ambiente Escolar)  LGBTQ+ youth, speak out about your school experiences! (Jóvenes LGBTQ+ – ¡Hable de sus experiencias en la escuela!)

The 2017 National School Climate Survey is GLSEN’s tenth national survey of lesbian, gay, bisexual+, transgender, and queer youth. It is a crucial tool in GLSEN’s mission for fighting anti-LGBTQ+ bias in K-12 schools across the nation. The information gathered from this survey will help GLSEN to inform education policymakers and the public about the right of all students to be treated with respect in their schools. 

La Nacional sobre el Ambiente Escolar 2017 es la décima encuesta de jóvenes lesbianas, homosexuales, bisexuales, transgéneros, y queer. Es fundamental a la misión de GLSEN a luchar contra los prejuicios anti-LGBTQ+ que existe en las escuelas K-12 en todo el país. La información recopilada a partir de esta encuesta ayudará a GLSEN a informar legisladores de educación y el público sobre el derecho que tienen todos los estudiantes ser tratados con respeto en las escuelas.

If you attended high school or middle school sometime during the last school year (2016-2017), identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual+, transgender, queer or questioning, and are at least 13 years old, tell us about your experiences in school. (If you did not complete the entire school year you can still participate in the survey.) The survey is completely anonymous.

Si asistió un colegio o una escuela mediana alguna vez durante el último año escolar (2016-2017), identifica como lesbiana, homosexual, bisexual+, transgénero, queer o está cuestionando su sexualidad, y tiene al menos de 13 años, cuéntanos sus experiencias en la escuela. (Si no completó todo el año escolar todavía puede participar en la encuesta.) La encuesta está completamente anónima.

The survey asks questions about your experiences in school, including hearing homophobic remarks, being harassed because of your sexual orientation and/or how you express your gender and how supportive your school is of LGBTQ+ students.

La encuesta contiene preguntas sobre sus experiencias escolares, incluyendo si ha oído comentarios homofóbicos, si ha acosado a causa de su orientación sexual y/o como expresa su género y como su escuela apoya los estudiantes LGBTQ+.

To take the survey, click here.
Para hacer la encuesta en español, haz click aquí.

I have met hundreds of bisexuals and when the question of being out as bi+ on the gay scene comes up, everyone agrees: being denied a voice is bad enough but being denied our existence is appalling.

If you don’t like Mozart, it doesn’t mean some other people are lying when they say they really do. Some people really like aubergines, some people really enjoyed cross-country running at school – some people really do enjoy the things you don’t. Some people really are bisexual.

The definition is easy, it’s the prejudice that’s hard.

I have met hundreds of bisexuals and when the question of being out as bi+ on the gay scene comes up, everyone agrees: being denied a voice is bad enough but being denied our existence is appalling.

If you don’t like Mozart, it doesn’t mean some other people are lying when they say they really do. Some people really like aubergines, some people really enjoyed cross-country running at school – some people really do enjoy the things you don’t. Some people really are bisexual.

The definition is easy, it’s the prejudice that’s hard.

Marcus Morgan, a co-ordinator of The Bisexual Index, a UK bisexual activist group in an Pink News opinion piece 

miles-thebi:

If you define bisexuality as “an attraction to men and women”, then define pansexuality a “an attraction to men, women, and transgender individuals”, you are using transphobia to support a biphobic idea of bisexuality.

Simple as that.

The transphobia should be obvious; making the distinction between men, women, and transgender individuals invalidates trans men and trans women as ACTUAL men and women. It also places all transgender individuals in this “other” category. Not man, not women, no matter how they identify their gender. Trans women are actual women, not an “other” kind of woman. Trans men are actual men, not an “other” kind of men. Nonbinary people can identify under the terms “men” and “women” if they choose to, and they will still be just as valid as men and women as another individual.

The biphobia may be a little less obvious, however. Bisexuality is not defined as an attraction to cis men and cis women (saying so actually invalidates many bisexual people and aids in the invalidation of actual trans/nonbinary bisexuals), it is defined by the majority of the community as a “attraction to two or more genders or same and different genders”. The act of claiming otherwise (on a community level, not a personal definition level) is erasive and contributes to biphobia within the LGTBQ++ community.

Your argument that “bisexuals are attracted to cis men and cis women” not only invalidates trans men and trans women, and nobinary/trans bisexuals, it results in two very dangerous dynamics in the LGTBQ++ community.

Firstly, it creates tension between the bisexual and transgender/nonbinary communities. Historically, this is a fairly recent tension, as trans activists and bisexual activists often worked hand in hand during the first trans rights movement. This dynamic shreds apart two of some of the closet knit communities, and forces transgender people to identify as labels other than bisexual, else they face a wave of biphobia from their fellow transgender community. Despite this (thankfully), a large amount of transgender individuals identify as bisexual, and have begun doing what they can to end the faulty idea that bisexual is binary.

The second dynamic is constant fighting between the bisexual and pansexual community. Opinions about umbrella term usage aside, these communities have an enormous amount of overlap that requires them to work together to fight ideas of monosexism; a social system that operates on the belief that single gender attraction is the standard, and enforces this by rewarding SGA and punishing MGA. Gay/Lesbian monosexism operates in a different environment than hetero monosexism, but both cause strife towards the MGA communities.

These dynamics are reinforced daily by all members of the LGBTQ++ that continue to allow the bisexual definition of “attraction to cis men and cis women” to spread and be taken as the real definition. Until the rest of the LGBTQ++ gets on board and begins to allow bisexuals to define their community, and their individual forms of attraction, we will not be able to heal the fracturing relationships between BT and P.

miles-thebi:

If you define bisexuality as “an attraction to men and women”, then define pansexuality a “an attraction to men, women, and transgender individuals”, you are using transphobia to support a biphobic idea of bisexuality.

Simple as that.

The transphobia should be obvious; making the distinction between men, women, and transgender individuals invalidates trans men and trans women as ACTUAL men and women. It also places all transgender individuals in this “other” category. Not man, not women, no matter how they identify their gender. Trans women are actual women, not an “other” kind of woman. Trans men are actual men, not an “other” kind of men. Nonbinary people can identify under the terms “men” and “women” if they choose to, and they will still be just as valid as men and women as another individual.

The biphobia may be a little less obvious, however. Bisexuality is not defined as an attraction to cis men and cis women (saying so actually invalidates many bisexual people and aids in the invalidation of actual trans/nonbinary bisexuals), it is defined by the majority of the community as a “attraction to two or more genders or same and different genders”. The act of claiming otherwise (on a community level, not a personal definition level) is erasive and contributes to biphobia within the LGTBQ++ community.

Your argument that “bisexuals are attracted to cis men and cis women” not only invalidates trans men and trans women, and nobinary/trans bisexuals, it results in two very dangerous dynamics in the LGTBQ++ community.

Firstly, it creates tension between the bisexual and transgender/nonbinary communities. Historically, this is a fairly recent tension, as trans activists and bisexual activists often worked hand in hand during the first trans rights movement. This dynamic shreds apart two of some of the closet knit communities, and forces transgender people to identify as labels other than bisexual, else they face a wave of biphobia from their fellow transgender community. Despite this (thankfully), a large amount of transgender individuals identify as bisexual, and have begun doing what they can to end the faulty idea that bisexual is binary.

The second dynamic is constant fighting between the bisexual and pansexual community. Opinions about umbrella term usage aside, these communities have an enormous amount of overlap that requires them to work together to fight ideas of monosexism; a social system that operates on the belief that single gender attraction is the standard, and enforces this by rewarding SGA and punishing MGA. Gay/Lesbian monosexism operates in a different environment than hetero monosexism, but both cause strife towards the MGA communities.

These dynamics are reinforced daily by all members of the LGBTQ++ that continue to allow the bisexual definition of “attraction to cis men and cis women” to spread and be taken as the real definition. Until the rest of the LGBTQ++ gets on board and begins to allow bisexuals to define their community, and their individual forms of attraction, we will not be able to heal the fracturing relationships between BT and P.

koricomics:

A little sketch comic about how bisexuality is totally cool and good and not bad.

The format is

cliché!  I know.  But it makes it easy to talk about things I want to talk about.  Thanks for reading!

(I shouldn’t have to say this, but since a lot of people wanted to educate me on twitter: The words listed in panel seven [yes even in the parentheticals!] are just examples of how often acceptable language around gender and sexuality changes.  They are not lists of synonymous words, and many of them are now considered unacceptable.  That’s why they’re on the list. That’s what the list IS. I know.)

koricomics:

A little sketch comic about how bisexuality is totally cool and good and not bad.

The format is

cliché!  I know.  But it makes it easy to talk about things I want to talk about.  Thanks for reading!

(I shouldn’t have to say this, but since a lot of people wanted to educate me on twitter: The words listed in panel seven [yes even in the parentheticals!] are just examples of how often acceptable language around gender and sexuality changes.  They are not lists of synonymous words, and many of them are now considered unacceptable.  That’s why they’re on the list. That’s what the list IS. I know.)

autismserenity:

[image description: an extreme close-up of light blue forget-me-not flowers against a blurry blue background. white art deco letters in all caps say “monosexuality is a heterosexist idea used to oppress gay people and erase bisexuality from history and society”] 

i just 

i just got inspired by the 1990 Bisexual Manifesto  

like what if they were right? what if the concept of monosexism rests on the insistence that there ARE two and only two genders, two and only two sexes, two and only two gender roles, to pair up in the first place? that makes sense, doesn’t it? 

what if that means that it doesn’t just loathe bisexuals, because our very existence breaks that binary, but also intersex people, aces/aros, and trans people of all types? 

what if that means that it does tolerate both straight and gay people, on the surface, but it’s demanding a rigid adherence to gender norms that the majority of gay people don’t fit into in the first place?

remember how Senator Barney Frank, and the HRC, fought for years to keep “gender identity and expression” out of the united states’s Employment Non-Discrimination Act? and even the Advocate magazine said, if it had passed that way, “many LGB individuals would have still been vulnerable to job loss as it would remain perfectly legal to fire a masculine-presenting woman or a feminine-presenting man. Those viewed as somehow outside of what society expects from us in terms of gender would remain a target.”

what if that’s heterosexism versus monosexism?

One part of our community sees things as being centered around “gay versus straight”, and thinks that we are only oppressed if people think we’re gay. Some of those folks acknowledge that cissexism exists alongside it, so people are oppressed for being gay or trans. In this worldview, people who “look straight” – intersex people, aces/aros, “het-partnered” bisexuals, nonbinary people, straight and passing trans people – are privileged. Gay men, lesbians, and anybody who will be read as gay or non-passing, are oppressed.

The other part of our community sees things as being centered around “violating the gender binary”, and thinks that we are oppressed when we are seen as bending or breaking that binary. This includes gay men, lesbians, and/or non-passing trans people, but it also includes everyone who is nonbinary, passing trans people, intersex, ace, aro, bi, et cetera.

Because the rule of the gender binary is that there have to be two and only two genders, which have to correspond correctly with the two and only two sexes that are acknowledged, and the two and only two gender roles, and they have to be with each other, and only each other. That is how the gender binary works. That’s what it is.

I think that one perspective is what we label as “heterosexism,” and the other is what we label as “monosexism”. I think this is the big divide that has always, always been present in the community. And I think that lately we’re being told over and over, by the first group, that believing monosexism exists is anti-gay, and it’s keeping everyone from seeing that actually, monosexism itself is anti-gay.

autismserenity:

[image description: an extreme close-up of light blue forget-me-not flowers against a blurry blue background. white art deco letters in all caps say “monosexuality is a heterosexist idea used to oppress gay people and erase bisexuality from history and society”] 

i just 

i just got inspired by the 1990 Bisexual Manifesto  

like what if they were right? what if the concept of monosexism rests on the insistence that there ARE two and only two genders, two and only two sexes, two and only two gender roles, to pair up in the first place? that makes sense, doesn’t it? 

what if that means that it doesn’t just loathe bisexuals, because our very existence breaks that binary, but also intersex people, aces/aros, and trans people of all types? 

what if that means that it does tolerate both straight and gay people, on the surface, but it’s demanding a rigid adherence to gender norms that the majority of gay people don’t fit into in the first place?

remember how Senator Barney Frank, and the HRC, fought for years to keep “gender identity and expression” out of the united states’s Employment Non-Discrimination Act? and even the Advocate magazine said, if it had passed that way, “many LGB individuals would have still been vulnerable to job loss as it would remain perfectly legal to fire a masculine-presenting woman or a feminine-presenting man. Those viewed as somehow outside of what society expects from us in terms of gender would remain a target.”

what if that’s heterosexism versus monosexism?

One part of our community sees things as being centered around “gay versus straight”, and thinks that we are only oppressed if people think we’re gay. Some of those folks acknowledge that cissexism exists alongside it, so people are oppressed for being gay or trans. In this worldview, people who “look straight” – intersex people, aces/aros, “het-partnered” bisexuals, nonbinary people, straight and passing trans people – are privileged. Gay men, lesbians, and anybody who will be read as gay or non-passing, are oppressed.

The other part of our community sees things as being centered around “violating the gender binary”, and thinks that we are oppressed when we are seen as bending or breaking that binary. This includes gay men, lesbians, and/or non-passing trans people, but it also includes everyone who is nonbinary, passing trans people, intersex, ace, aro, bi, et cetera.

Because the rule of the gender binary is that there have to be two and only two genders, which have to correspond correctly with the two and only two sexes that are acknowledged, and the two and only two gender roles, and they have to be with each other, and only each other. That is how the gender binary works. That’s what it is.

I think that one perspective is what we label as “heterosexism,” and the other is what we label as “monosexism”. I think this is the big divide that has always, always been present in the community. And I think that lately we’re being told over and over, by the first group, that believing monosexism exists is anti-gay, and it’s keeping everyone from seeing that actually, monosexism itself is anti-gay.