Category: Bi History

Freddie Mercury: INCREDIBLE thing Queen legend told Mary Austin when he revealed sexuality:

Maybe it’s not so much that Bi Guys don’t Come Out. Perhaps it’s more that no one listens when they do. Maybe it’s just that after a while  Bi Men stop trying and eventually shut up —

Recalling the eventual conversation in which he [ed note: Mary Austin’s then fiance, the late rock-star Freddie Mercury] told her he was bisexual, she told the Daily Mail in 2013: “I’ll never forget that moment. Being a bit naive, it had taken me a while to realise the truth.”

“Afterwards he felt good about having finally told me he was bisexual,” she added. “Although I do remember saying to him at the time, ‘No Freddie, I don’t think you are bisexual. I think you are gay.’”

Today as we celebrate the 21st Birthday of the Bisexual Pride Flag, we also should talk about how it’s creation is intertwined with the History of the creation of the Transgender Pride Flag

Here’s a video from the YouTube Channel of Trans-activist Monica Helms, the creator of the Trans Pride Flag where as she explains –

“Many people asked me about the history of the Trans Flag, so I made this video to give people the information. This is a remake, with new images and more effects. It is fun to watch.”

cowardly-bisexual:

bisexuality has always meant “could be attracted to anyone regardless of gender”

erikalynae:

Let’s talk about Brenda Howard for a sec because I feel like all of the people shouting that “het”-partnered bisexuals don’t belong at Pride are missing a good chunk of their Pride history.

Brenda was:

  • A bisexual, polyamorous woman and activist
  • In a “het” relationship with partner Larry Nelson
  • Known as the Mother of Pride for her work in organizing the first LGBT Pride events
  • A participant in the Stonewall Riots
  • An active member of the Gay Liberation Front, Gay Activists Alliance, Coalition for Lesbian and Gay Rights, BiPAC, and BiNET USA,  among others
  • Co-founder of the New York Area Bisexual Network
  • Founder of the first Alcoholics Anonymous chapter for bisexuals
  • An incredibly important figure in the LGBT community, who paved the way for Pride and LGBT activism as we know it today

“Het”-partnered bisexuals don’t just belong at Pride, they were integral to its creation.

(Bonus facts: Brenda was also Jewish, a sex worker, and an outspoken feminist. I highly recommend learning about her because she was seriously an amazing woman.)


Brenda Howard, Sylvia Rivera et al at 1970 STAR + GLF Protest Bellvue Hospital Fall 1970


Sylvia Rivera at 1970 STAR + GLF Protest Bellvue Hospital Fall 1970


Marsha P. Johnson at 1970 STAR + GLF Protest Bellvue Hospital Fall 1970

bihistorygroup:

[Know Your Bisexual History]: Photos from joint Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR) + Gay Liberation Front (GLF) protest for an end of oppressive treatment of LGBTQ Patients at NYC’s Bellevue Hospital (Fall 1970 credit Richard C. Wandel).

  1. Bisexual Activist Brenda Howard, GLF (standing far left, pigtails + glasses); Gay Activist Bob Kohler, GLF (sitting 2nd left, light hair); Trans*Bi Activist Sylvia Rivera, STAR + GLF (sitting 3rd left, dark hair)
  2. Trans*Bi Activist Sylvia Rivera, STAR + GLF
  3. Trans* Activist Marsha P. Johnson, STAR

At that time, NYC’s Bellevue Hospital followed prevailing thought that sexuality and gender identity that did not correspond to a narrow and binary view of normative behaviors was a sign of mental illness. Like many institutions they practiced Electroshock Therapy to “cure” bisexual as well as gay/lesbian people and mistreated LGBTQ patients who were simply there for routine medical complaints.

But all LGBTQ people, including large numbers of bisexual activists, began fighting back and by 1973 the American Psychiatric Association (APA) declassified homosexuality as a mental disorder.

“the meaning of Stonewall has shifted as the assimilations in favor of a ‘we’re just like them’ gay politics have struggled against the radical activists over the legacy of the riot and the broad, multi issue based activism which accompanied it.” ~“History or Myth? Writing Stonewall” by Benjamin Shepard in Lambda Book Report;Aug/Sep2004, Vol. 13 Issue ½


Brenda Howard, Sylvia Rivera et al at 1970 STAR + GLF Protest Bellvue Hospital Fall 1970


Sylvia Rivera at 1970 STAR + GLF Protest Bellvue Hospital Fall 1970


Marsha P. Johnson at 1970 STAR + GLF Protest Bellvue Hospital Fall 1970

bihistorygroup:

[Know Your Bisexual History]: Photos from joint Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR) + Gay Liberation Front (GLF) protest for an end of oppressive treatment of LGBTQ Patients at NYC’s Bellevue Hospital (Fall 1970 credit Richard C. Wandel).

  1. Bisexual Activist Brenda Howard, GLF (standing far left, pigtails + glasses); Gay Activist Bob Kohler, GLF (sitting 2nd left, light hair); Trans*Bi Activist Sylvia Rivera, STAR + GLF (sitting 3rd left, dark hair)
  2. Trans*Bi Activist Sylvia Rivera, STAR + GLF
  3. Trans* Activist Marsha P. Johnson, STAR

At that time, NYC’s Bellevue Hospital followed prevailing thought that sexuality and gender identity that did not correspond to a narrow and binary view of normative behaviors was a sign of mental illness. Like many institutions they practiced Electroshock Therapy to “cure” bisexual as well as gay/lesbian people and mistreated LGBTQ patients who were simply there for routine medical complaints.

But all LGBTQ people, including large numbers of bisexual activists, began fighting back and by 1973 the American Psychiatric Association (APA) declassified homosexuality as a mental disorder.

“the meaning of Stonewall has shifted as the assimilations in favor of a ‘we’re just like them’ gay politics have struggled against the radical activists over the legacy of the riot and the broad, multi issue based activism which accompanied it.” ~“History or Myth? Writing Stonewall” by Benjamin Shepard in Lambda Book Report;Aug/Sep2004, Vol. 13 Issue ½

bihistorygroup:

[Know Your Bisexual History]: Photos from joint Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR) + Gay Liberation Front (GLF) protest for an end of oppressive treatment of LGBTQ Patients at NYC’s Bellevue Hospital (Fall 1970 credit Richard C. Wandel).

  1. Bisexual Activist Brenda Howard, GLF (standing far left, pigtails + glasses); Gay Activist Bob Kohler, GLF (sitting 2nd left, light hair); Trans*Bi Activist Sylvia Rivera, STAR + GLF (sitting 3rd left, dark hair)
  2. Trans*Bi Activist Sylvia Rivera, STAR + GLF
  3. Trans* Activist Marsha P. Johnson, STAR

At that time, NYC’s Bellevue Hospital followed prevailing thought that sexuality and gender identity that did not correspond to a narrow and binary view of normative behaviors was a sign of mental illness. Like many institutions they practiced Electroshock Therapy to “cure” bisexual as well as gay/lesbian people and mistreated LGBTQ patients who were simply there for routine medical complaints.

But all LGBTQ people, including large numbers of bisexual activists, began fighting back and by 1973 the American Psychiatric Association (APA) declassified homosexuality as a mental disorder.

“the meaning of Stonewall has shifted as the assimilations in favor of a ‘we’re just like them’ gay politics have struggled against the radical activists over the legacy of the riot and the broad, multi issue based activism which accompanied it.” ~“History or Myth? Writing Stonewall” by Benjamin Shepard in Lambda Book Report;Aug/Sep2004, Vol. 13 Issue ½

optais-amme:

Preserving Bi Women’s History

Bisexual activist and scholar Robin Ochs just announced the successful conclusion of a project she has been working on for 7 ½ years in collaboration with Amy Benson of Harvard University’s Schlesinger Library.

Back issues of Bi Women (now the Bi Women Quarterly) (1983-2009) and of North Bi Northwest (a publication of the Seattle Bisexual Women’s Network) are now archived and available via Harvard University’s Schlesinger Library. They have been digitized, and are searchable and available to the public.

Here’s the press release from Harvard’s Schlesinger Library:

Boston is home to the longest-lived bisexual women’s periodical in the world. Bi Women Quarterly, a grassroots publication, began in September 1983 as a project of the newly-formed Boston Bisexual Women’s Network.

Staffed entirely by volunteers, and containing essays, poetry, artwork, and short fiction on a wide range of themes, Bi Women Quarterly provides a voice for women who identify as bisexual, pansexual, and other non-binary sexual identities.

Robyn Ochs, editor of Bi Women Quarterly since 2009, donated the only complete collection of this publication to Schlesinger Library several years ago with the agreement that it would be preserved, and digitized in a searchable format. The digitized collection at Schlesinger covers the years 1983 to 2010.

We are delighted to announce that this project is complete, and this resource is now available to researchers and to the general public through Harvard’s catalog.

Making the voices of bi women accessible will hopefully provide researchers primary material with which to begin to fill this gap.

Issues of Bi Women Quarterly from 2009 to the present can be found online a BiWomenBoston.org. These more recent issues will be added to the Library’s collection in the near future.