Category: BiPoC

Why People of Color Need Spaces Without White People:

citing her examination of intersectionality within women’s movements, professor Laurel Weldon argues that Inviting Marginalized Subgroups to Hold Their Own Spaces tends to Strengthen Broader Movements

To be a truly inclusive space, it must be created by causes and conditions that allow it to happen organically … If you try to manufacture that presence out of your own ego, it will never happen…

alphabetsoupcomic:

Page 97!!  Happy Pride Month!! 

blackmenconfessions:I’m bi person of color! Who is out and proud! I’m tired of getting bash by dl…


Boston MA USA Bisexual Resource Center (BRC) Bi+ Community Activities Meetup Group


Bisexual Resource Center’s 2017 Bisexual Plus Summer Potluck Picnic in Cambridge MA USA

[Cambridge MA USA]: 

Bi+ Summer Potluck Picnic!

Please join the members of the greater Boston area’s Bisexual+ Resource Center (BRC) on Saturday July 15th 2017 from 2 PM – 4 PM

for an informal summer social at Cambridge Commons Park. We encourage everyone to bring a potluck item to share.

This will be a great opportunity to meet other members of local Bi+ Meetup(s) and Groups you may not have had the opportunity to attend as well as connect with many of the nice people from the local Bi+ Community. Partners, friends, and allies are also welcome.

Rain date is Sunday July 16th or we will also consider moving indoors to Cambridge Common Restaurant if the weather warrants it.


Note: Bisexual+ (Bi+ for short pronounced “Bi Plus”) is *shorthand* for ALL Non-Monosexual people inclusive of but not limited to: Bisexual & Biromantic as well as Ambisexual, Flexisexual, Fluid, Heteroflexible & Homoflexible, Multisexual, No Labels, Omnisexual, Pansexual, Polysexual, Pomosexual, SGL (Same-gender Loving), Sapiosexual, Queer-identified, Questioning et al.

Additionally the Bisexual+ Community has always/will always include people of ALL genders/gender identification including but not limited to: Androgynous, Cis, Genderqueer, Gender-Nonconforming, Intersex, Non-binary, Trans, et al.

thefrizzkid:

Your sexuality, your rules. Your body, your choices. ✨

[Image: Set on a light pink background, drawing of the face of a young, pretty, feminine appearing, dark-skinned person, with classic West-African features. They have shoulder length hair in the Pink Purple and Blue colors of the Bisexual Pride Flag.

Their expression is calm with their eyes closed as if in deep thought or contemplation. Above to the left and below to the right are golden stars.]

lukeethornhill:

As it’s Pride month and as I don’t think people realise the Pride flag has been adapted a lot over time (I’ve seen over 20 versions so far). I thought it would be nice to shine a light on a few of the alternative versions of the Pride flag. 

As a community, we should be working together to battle inequality. POC don’t feel part of our community so if having the More Color More Pride flag helps even slightly then please don’t stand in anyone’s way. It’s not replacing the Gilbert flag, just like none of these flags have replaced it. 

Also, just consider this comment I found on FB:
‘The “But we don’t need it because it already represents everyone” complaints sound very much like the straight people who are uncomfortable with the attention we get and try to put on straight pride.’

lukeethornhill:

As it’s Pride month and as I don’t think people realise the Pride flag has been adapted a lot over time (I’ve seen over 20 versions so far). I thought it would be nice to shine a light on a few of the alternative versions of the Pride flag. 

As a community, we should be working together to battle inequality. POC don’t feel part of our community so if having the More Color More Pride flag helps even slightly then please don’t stand in anyone’s way. It’s not replacing the Gilbert flag, just like none of these flags have replaced it. 

Also, just consider this comment I found on FB:
‘The “But we don’t need it because it already represents everyone” complaints sound very much like the straight people who are uncomfortable with the attention we get and try to put on straight pride.’

binetusa:

Online Discussion – No Homo No Hetero: Being Black, Bisexual, & Male in America

When seeking answers to questions regarding healthy identity development and overcoming multiple, intersecting oppressions, Black Bisexual Men have Very Few options.

Join us online on Saturday June 24th 2017 from 11 AM to 1 PM (NYC time) 

explore the impact and challenges of this particular work by discussing identity, race, biphobia, manhood and the intersecting oppression of being Black and Fluid with a panel of MenKind organizers, members, supporters and allies.

We will discuss the ever evolving nuances of the Black male bisexual experience: identity, racism, biphobia and media representation; manhood, masculinity, myths, HIV and the overall health, well being and liberation of Black bisexual men.

binetusa:

Online Discussion – No Homo No Hetero: Being Black, Bisexual, & Male in America

When seeking answers to questions regarding healthy identity development and overcoming multiple, intersecting oppressions, Black Bisexual Men have Very Few options.

Join us online on Saturday June 24th 2017 from 11 AM to 1 PM (NYC time) 

explore the impact and challenges of this particular work by discussing identity, race, biphobia, manhood and the intersecting oppression of being Black and Fluid with a panel of MenKind organizers, members, supporters and allies.

We will discuss the ever evolving nuances of the Black male bisexual experience: identity, racism, biphobia and media representation; manhood, masculinity, myths, HIV and the overall health, well being and liberation of Black bisexual men.

binetusa:

Online Discussion – No Homo No Hetero: Being Black, Bisexual, & Male in America

When seeking answers to questions regarding healthy identity development and overcoming multiple, intersecting oppressions, Black Bisexual Men have Very Few options.

Join us online on Saturday June 24th 2017 from 11 AM to 1 PM (NYC time) 

explore the impact and challenges of this particular work by discussing identity, race, biphobia, manhood and the intersecting oppression of being Black and Fluid with a panel of MenKind organizers, members, supporters and allies.

We will discuss the ever evolving nuances of the Black male bisexual experience: identity, racism, biphobia and media representation; manhood, masculinity, myths, HIV and the overall health, well being and liberation of Black bisexual men.