Category: Queer Studies

Seeking a New Lens to Study Same-Sex Behavior in Animals:

“The expectation has been that same-sex sexual behavior evolved in different species independently, against this default background of heterosexual sex,” says Ambika Kamath, a researcher at the University of California, Berkeley, and co-author on the study.

“And what we’re saying is that baseline isn’t necessarily the right baseline”…

Instead, the researchers suggest that same sex behavior is bound up in the very origins of animal sex. It hasn’t had to continually re-evolve: It’s always been there…

An issue with past research in the field, Dr. Lambert said, is that unexamined cultural projections — largely by the white heterosexual men who have dominated the field — resulted in many researchers failing to accurately document what they were seeing…

researchers suggest that same-sex behavior is bound up in the very origins of animal sex. It hasn’t had to continually re-evolve: It’s always been there…

Variation is the baseline, and that baseline persists to this day.”

Myths About Bisexual People Aren’t Just Wrong — They’re Dangerous:

I always knew that women are at a higher risk of sexual assault and relationship violence … But what I didn’t know is, we are more vulnerable to violence depending on our sexual orientation. And bisexual women are particularly at risk…

Nicole Johnson a psychology professor at Lehigh University was researching sexual violence victimization when she noticed a trend: bisexual women experience more harm … she argues that three factors make bi women more likely to be abused. 

  1. First, cultural stereotypes portray bisexual women as constantly sexually available, regardless of our consent.
  2. Second, high rates of substance use across the LGBTQ community leave us vulnerable to violence.
  3. Finally, biphobic harassment—being targeted especially for our identities—ups our risk.“

“These disparities are the result of having to exist in hostile and toxic social environments,” says Robyn Ochs “They’re not a result of our identities” too often, people blame bi identity for what is, in reality, preconceived notions about bisexual people that promote society-wide discrimination. This focus on discrimination is called the minority stress model “Living under stress is exhausting,” says Ochs. “It’s not good for our health.”

One stressor that bi women face, as Johnson found, is harmful stereotypes about our sexuality It’s a reality faced by bisexual women in American culture, and it’s called hypersexualization “People often mistake someone coming out as bisexual as a sexual invitation,” says Ochs…

novhater:

this is so depressing. i saw this linked on another post with the flavor text being “most gay/lesbian people see bisexuals positively now” but actually reading the article it’s like people actually just tolerate our existence. according to this article when people (of every sexuality except bi) were asked to agree/disagree with “bisexual people have the ability to be faithful” 40% of people selected “neither agree nor disagree”. everyone’s real champions of bi rights saying that bisexual stereotypes may or may not be true, who’s to say

bilations:
“Why do you need to use terms like monosexism? Stop being so divisive!”

Translation: Bi…

bilations:

“Why do you need to use terms like monosexism? Stop being so divisive!”

Translation: Bi people using their own terms to describe their own experiences is divisive and bad. Anything that suggests that bi people’s experiences are different from gay people’s are terrible. Don’t you know that unity involves completely ignoring your own issues if they don’t include us?

autismserenity:

[image description: an extreme close-up of light blue forget-me-not flowers against a blurry blue background. white art deco letters in all caps say “monosexuality is a heterosexist idea used to oppress gay people and erase bisexuality from history and society”] 

i just 

i just got inspired by the 1990 Bisexual Manifesto  

like what if they were right? what if the concept of monosexism rests on the insistence that there ARE two and only two genders, two and only two sexes, two and only two gender roles, to pair up in the first place? that makes sense, doesn’t it? 

what if that means that it doesn’t just loathe bisexuals, because our very existence breaks that binary, but also intersex people, aces/aros, and trans people of all types? 

what if that means that it does tolerate both straight and gay people, on the surface, but it’s demanding a rigid adherence to gender norms that the majority of gay people don’t fit into in the first place?

remember how Senator Barney Frank, and the HRC, fought for years to keep “gender identity and expression” out of the united states’s Employment Non-Discrimination Act? and even the Advocate magazine said, if it had passed that way, “many LGB individuals would have still been vulnerable to job loss as it would remain perfectly legal to fire a masculine-presenting woman or a feminine-presenting man. Those viewed as somehow outside of what society expects from us in terms of gender would remain a target.”

what if that’s heterosexism versus monosexism?

One part of our community sees things as being centered around “gay versus straight”, and thinks that we are only oppressed if people think we’re gay. Some of those folks acknowledge that cissexism exists alongside it, so people are oppressed for being gay or trans. In this worldview, people who “look straight” – intersex people, aces/aros, “het-partnered” bisexuals, nonbinary people, straight and passing trans people – are privileged. Gay men, lesbians, and anybody who will be read as gay or non-passing, are oppressed.

The other part of our community sees things as being centered around “violating the gender binary”, and thinks that we are oppressed when we are seen as bending or breaking that binary. This includes gay men, lesbians, and/or non-passing trans people, but it also includes everyone who is nonbinary, passing trans people, intersex, ace, aro, bi, et cetera.

Because the rule of the gender binary is that there have to be two and only two genders, which have to correspond correctly with the two and only two sexes that are acknowledged, and the two and only two gender roles, and they have to be with each other, and only each other. That is how the gender binary works. That’s what it is.

I think that one perspective is what we label as “heterosexism,” and the other is what we label as “monosexism”. I think this is the big divide that has always, always been present in the community. And I think that lately we’re being told over and over, by the first group, that believing monosexism exists is anti-gay, and it’s keeping everyone from seeing that actually, monosexism itself is anti-gay.

autismserenity:

[image description: an extreme close-up of light blue forget-me-not flowers against a blurry blue background. white art deco letters in all caps say “monosexuality is a heterosexist idea used to oppress gay people and erase bisexuality from history and society”] 

i just 

i just got inspired by the 1990 Bisexual Manifesto  

like what if they were right? what if the concept of monosexism rests on the insistence that there ARE two and only two genders, two and only two sexes, two and only two gender roles, to pair up in the first place? that makes sense, doesn’t it? 

what if that means that it doesn’t just loathe bisexuals, because our very existence breaks that binary, but also intersex people, aces/aros, and trans people of all types? 

what if that means that it does tolerate both straight and gay people, on the surface, but it’s demanding a rigid adherence to gender norms that the majority of gay people don’t fit into in the first place?

remember how Senator Barney Frank, and the HRC, fought for years to keep “gender identity and expression” out of the united states’s Employment Non-Discrimination Act? and even the Advocate magazine said, if it had passed that way, “many LGB individuals would have still been vulnerable to job loss as it would remain perfectly legal to fire a masculine-presenting woman or a feminine-presenting man. Those viewed as somehow outside of what society expects from us in terms of gender would remain a target.”

what if that’s heterosexism versus monosexism?

One part of our community sees things as being centered around “gay versus straight”, and thinks that we are only oppressed if people think we’re gay. Some of those folks acknowledge that cissexism exists alongside it, so people are oppressed for being gay or trans. In this worldview, people who “look straight” – intersex people, aces/aros, “het-partnered” bisexuals, nonbinary people, straight and passing trans people – are privileged. Gay men, lesbians, and anybody who will be read as gay or non-passing, are oppressed.

The other part of our community sees things as being centered around “violating the gender binary”, and thinks that we are oppressed when we are seen as bending or breaking that binary. This includes gay men, lesbians, and/or non-passing trans people, but it also includes everyone who is nonbinary, passing trans people, intersex, ace, aro, bi, et cetera.

Because the rule of the gender binary is that there have to be two and only two genders, which have to correspond correctly with the two and only two sexes that are acknowledged, and the two and only two gender roles, and they have to be with each other, and only each other. That is how the gender binary works. That’s what it is.

I think that one perspective is what we label as “heterosexism,” and the other is what we label as “monosexism”. I think this is the big divide that has always, always been present in the community. And I think that lately we’re being told over and over, by the first group, that believing monosexism exists is anti-gay, and it’s keeping everyone from seeing that actually, monosexism itself is anti-gay.

biandboujeee:

I am seeking participants for a research study on the challenges (biphobia in particular) that bi+ women experience while participating in LGBTQ activism on campus. 

Anyone who… 

  1. identifies as a woman to some degree who also experiences attraction to more than one gender (including but not limited to: bisexual, pansexual, polysexual, queer, fluid),
  2. is a current undergraduate student (or recent graduate) who is (or has been) involved in at least one LGBTQ student organization on campus, 
  3. and is interested in sharing their experiences 

…is encouraged to fill out this brief survey to be eligible to be interviewed!

biandboujeee:

I am seeking participants for a research study on the challenges (biphobia in particular) that bi+ women experience while participating in LGBTQ activism on campus. 

Anyone who… 

  1. identifies as a woman to some degree who also experiences attraction to more than one gender (including but not limited to: bisexual, pansexual, polysexual, queer, fluid),
  2. is a current undergraduate student (or recent graduate) who is (or has been) involved in at least one LGBTQ student organization on campus, 
  3. and is interested in sharing their experiences 

…is encouraged to fill out this brief survey to be eligible to be interviewed!

optais-amme:

Preserving Bi Women’s History

Bisexual activist and scholar Robin Ochs just announced the successful conclusion of a project she has been working on for 7 ½ years in collaboration with Amy Benson of Harvard University’s Schlesinger Library.

Back issues of Bi Women (now the Bi Women Quarterly) (1983-2009) and of North Bi Northwest (a publication of the Seattle Bisexual Women’s Network) are now archived and available via Harvard University’s Schlesinger Library. They have been digitized, and are searchable and available to the public.

Here’s the press release from Harvard’s Schlesinger Library:

Boston is home to the longest-lived bisexual women’s periodical in the world. Bi Women Quarterly, a grassroots publication, began in September 1983 as a project of the newly-formed Boston Bisexual Women’s Network.

Staffed entirely by volunteers, and containing essays, poetry, artwork, and short fiction on a wide range of themes, Bi Women Quarterly provides a voice for women who identify as bisexual, pansexual, and other non-binary sexual identities.

Robyn Ochs, editor of Bi Women Quarterly since 2009, donated the only complete collection of this publication to Schlesinger Library several years ago with the agreement that it would be preserved, and digitized in a searchable format. The digitized collection at Schlesinger covers the years 1983 to 2010.

We are delighted to announce that this project is complete, and this resource is now available to researchers and to the general public through Harvard’s catalog.

Making the voices of bi women accessible will hopefully provide researchers primary material with which to begin to fill this gap.

Issues of Bi Women Quarterly from 2009 to the present can be found online a BiWomenBoston.org. These more recent issues will be added to the Library’s collection in the near future.